Saints

The rough cut diamond that’s not for sale

On August 15, 2015, Southampton were trailing Everton by two goals to nil as the referee put an end to the first 45 minutes. Roberto Martinez’s team had been sharp, alert and clinical, but Ronald Koeman’s boys were lacklustre, lazy-legged, and desperately needing change. Koeman turned to his bench and handed a Southampton debut to one of football’s forgotten men: Oriol Romeu.

Within minutes, the Spaniard took charge of the midfield and clattered James McCarthy with what has now become a trademark feature of his game – a crunching tackle with a customary yellow card too.

For the first time in the 2015/16 season there was finally a showing of passion and fight on the field, and despite being unable to change the result, Romeu had started his quest to develop as a footballer and finally find a club that he can call home. A year down the line, he has most certainly achieved that.

The growth in Oriol Romeu at Southampton FC has been staggering. When he arrived in the summer of 2015 for a £5m fee, the fans appeared to be in agreement. He was ready to prove a point, physically dominant over the opposition and gifted on the ball. At the same time, he was a raw talent and clearly lacking experience. He possessed the ability to execute those vital tackles and passes, but would often mistime and misplace them. He was rusty, but perhaps that’s no surprise when you’re a victim of the Chelsea loan system.

Like a professional, he kept his head down and continued to strive for improvement; waiting for the chances to come his way. And when they did, he made sure to make the most of them, often leaving onlookers at St Mary’s desperate to see more. Koeman, on the other hand had different ideas, with the most common position for Romeu following a top performance, being the bench.

There is no denying that there were obvious faults in Romeu’s play – the most obvious being his ill-disciplined style and wayward positioning – but his inability to gain a starting place was cruel. Fans would argue against Koeman’s team selection, saying the Dutchman showed an unfair favouritism toward Victor Wanyama. Maybe, but not a whisper was made to his agent or the media. Romeu just tried and tried again.

As an outsider looking in, it seemed to me that Romeu was quite simply still grateful for the opportunity handed to him by Southampton. The trust from the club and the morale of our dressing room appears to have allowed Romeu to call our club home, and for that, he was prepared to fight for a starting spot.  

Then along came Claude Puel this summer and with him, the best of Oriol Romeu.

Puel came to Southampton with a clear philosophy and set of ideas in his mind; he knew exactly what he wanted and just what type of players he needed to carry it out. Luckily for Romeu, the formation in focus is the 4-4-2 diamond and this presented him the opportunity to make the defensive midfield position his own.

The first few fixtures were tough; not only for Romeu but for the whole team. Each player not only had to familiarise themselves with their new role, but they also had to learn about the roles of their teammates and what that meant for them during an in-game situation.

A slow start for all players in the Southampton side was inevitable – anything else would have been a miracle at work – but few have taken to their new role as smoothly as Romeu.

The cup game against Crystal Palace aside – where he used a heavily rotated side – Romeu has started every competitive game under Puel so far – the perfect testament to the Spaniard’s clear improvement. But just what role is Romeu playing exactly?

Over the past six games that Romeu has started in, we’ve truly been able to see just what Puel is demanding from the man at the base of the midfield diamond. During build up play, Romeu has been operating as an auxiliary centre back. This involves Romeu often dropping in between the centre backs, therefore giving Van Dijk and Fonte the freedom to spread wider, and the fullbacks freedom to push higher up the field. This positioning from Romeu allows for the composed possession-based play that has gifted us so many passing options in recent fixtures.

He’s executed this role with perfection too, showing that he has the discipline to remain in position and the technique to control the tempo of the game. In addition to this, he’s also been making so many of these passes with his first or second touch of the ball – only a player with an immense understanding of his teammates can carry out such a difficult task.

What makes this all the more impressive however, is that throughout Romeu’s career, he has so often played with a partner alongside him in the midfield. It takes an abundance of intelligence and ability to switch from a midfield role that you’ve become so accustomed to – a double pivot – into a lone defensive midfielder.

Romeu serves as the first passing option for the CB’s, he’s responsible for breaking up opposition attacks, he so often initiates our counter’s and is effective in recycling play – handing out such key tasks to one single player shows just how much faith and trust Claude Puel has placed in Romeu.

With the combination of Romeu’s standout attitude and Puel’s attention to detail, Southampton are making remarkable progress to ensure that the rough diamond that joined our club in the summer of 2015, will soon be the finished product. One thing though. This diamond isn’t for sale.

 

A tactical analysis of Claude Puel’s Southampton

It’s so nearly back. After almost two and a half months, there are now just three days left until the Premier League season is back underway and St Mary’s is once again rocking. But in Southampton’s usual fashion, they will enter the forthcoming season with multiple changes both on and off the pitch. Most notably, the managerial switch that has seen Claude Puel take over from Ronald Koeman. With pre-season now over, many Southampton fans are optimistic that we can once again defy the odds, but in truth, many just aren’t too sure on how Puel is going to do that. So, after analysing Puel’s red and white army over their six pre-season fixtures, were here to explain how.

Let’s start with the basics. Since taking over at Southampton, Puel has confidently taken to the 4-4-2 diamond formation. This formation (as shown below) holds a four man defence, a deep lying midfielder, two central midfielders ahead of the DLM, a playmaker and two strikers.

Screen Shot 2016-08-08 at 17.52.14

Unsurprisingly, this midfield focused formation allows Puel’s side to adopt a patient style of play with the aim of keeping the ball fixed to the floor. These aims are achieved through the multiple passing triangles that are made available via the formation and player intelligence – an example of a triangle in the 4-4-2 diamond formation is the positioning of the two CB’s and the deep lying midfielder.

Puel’s aim is to ensure that these triangles continue to be formed in almost every passage of play. The simple concept of triangles in football allows for there to be a large number of passing options at all times, but it takes great understanding from each player to make it an effective means of ball retention and attacking play. When carried out effectively, this patient passing system will suddenly draw an opposition player out of position, and in that moment, the opportunity must be seized with a sudden burst of pace and movement. This concept of Puel’s will allow for some potentially beautiful and fluid football to be played at St. Mary’s stadium this season.

As for when the team isn’t in possession, the general means of recovery is through a relentless high-pressing system that ensures that the midfield diamond is always in shape – the diamond constantly shifts the midfield players about as it’s a ball-oriented system (but more on that later).

So, in the same way that Puel likes to build from the back, it seems logical that we start this analysis from the back too. Simply click onto the next page to begin the analysis.

The torrid love affair between football and delusion

Football can do dangerous things to a man. But perhaps the most common trait is the outright stupidity that this beautiful game can make a man see, spout and shout. Whether your vision is tainted by a prestigious history that is failing to repeat itself, through a lack of knowledge in football, or just your love for your boyhood club, delusion is at the heart of every football fan. And regardless of whether you visit lowly Hereford FC at the weekend or have the joy of watching the Catalan giants, Barcelona, there are aspects of delusion, that as fans, we simply can’t hide.

Looking back, I’m sure we can all remember the first time we fell in love with a footballer. As a Southampton fan from birth, I had the joy of experiencing near and actual relegations and financial conundrums from the age of eight – about the age that you truly begin to fall for your club. So, naturally, just like any other child would at that age, to a backdrop of other fans screaming from the terrace with faces apparently broadcasting the dreadful time they were having, I took an unorthodox approach in selecting my favourite player… whoever looked the coolest. Tragic, I know.

That player just so happened to be Rudi Skacel, and for that bizarre reason (combined with his fashionable arm tape and suave and alluring foreign name) he became my favourite player.

In my eyes, he couldn’t put a foot wrong. So much so, that when he would strike a ball 30 yards high of the goal, I would fervently seek any reason that could steer the blame from my beloved Rudi.

“The sun was in his eyes, I’m sure of it”

“He got crunched five minutes ago, that was the injury there!”

Dear god, I would even go as far to suggest that he must be wearing some new hair product, causing the gel to drop into his eye and place him off balance.

But perhaps the most enduring memory I hold of my unequivocal love for Skacel, was one that broke my heart and revealed the delusion right before my eyes.

My Father had always been opinionated in football, and in truth, as much as I hate to admit it – and he will love reading this – he’s rather intelligent when it comes to football. Even at such a young age, I worshiped his opinions. So, like a little Gary Neville, I saw my classroom as the Monday Night Football studio and repeated every last rant about the weekend’s fixtures, that my Dad had passed comment on.

But there was one topic that as a genuine Dad, he dared never touch upon. Rudi Skacel.

I would always ask him for his view on the man, but for the life of me, I couldn’t work out why he would quickly shift the conversation. I would excitedly point out any little trick that Skacel would pull off, only to be met by silence by my Dad.

Was I the only one watching and appreciating this clear talent before me? Well, as it turned out, yes. Yes, I was.

In one of the final games that Skacel was to ever play for Southampton, I remember a free-kick being awarded just 25 yards out from goal.

“Perfect Skacel territory,” I told myself.

But as he wrapped his left boot around the ball, the strike was met by a shout that would see me tear down my poster of the Czech playmaker later that night.

“Go back to Scotland to that tin shed that they call a football ground, you f*cking waste of space”

After two years of frustration, my Dad let it out. It was in that moment that my first love in football came crashing down.

2016: One damn good year for Southampton Football Club

As far as the 2015/16 season was concerned, Southampton fans had labelled the campaign a write off by late December. The club had seen their French sweetheart depart for Manchester United, had crushed their own dreams of success in the Europa League in the most unattractive fashion possible, and were sitting in 12th place as they entered the new year. But, just five months later, those troubles seem a world away, and maybe as Southampton fans, we should have known better. 2016 is proving to be quite the year for Southampton Football Club.

And it all began with the luck of the Irish(man) – Shane Long. As 2015 was coming to a close, Southampton fans were growing tired of the turgid football, low intensity and predictable play that had oddly, become a recurring issue under Koeman in the winter months. But with just one change, those issues were no more. With Shane Long’s introduction to the side on December 26th – Southampton’s 4-0 win over Arsenal – Southampton put into practice the hardest thing to do in the simple game that we all love; play simple football. Since then, Long has surpassed 10 goals in a Premier League season for the first time in his career, Southampton have a newfound fluidity up top, and they have returned to defending with the first line of defence; the attack. In just six months, Shane Long has transformed his title from super-sub, into one of the first names on Koeman’s team-sheet.

But whilst fans enjoyed the free-flowing football on offer, there stood one more problem, and that problem was standing between the sticks. To me, the goalkeeper is the most important player on the pitch, and Southampton’s early-season shot-stopping predicaments illustrated that perfectly. A strong goalkeeper is the root of the defences confidence, so when a weak link is placed under such pressure, don’t be surprised if it all comes crashing down. In contrast, when you place a strong keeper behind the back-line – such as Fraser Forster – the defence flourishes. Prior to the big man returning, Stekelenburg averaged 1.42 saves per goal and claimed just 35 catches in 17 appearances. In Forster’s 17 appearances over 2016, he has recorded an average rate of 2.75 saves per goal and claimed 61 catches. Fraser Forster’s statistics are vastly superior to Stekelenburg’s, and consequently, results have been prominent too. Without Forster’s return to the starting XI, I firmly believe that we wouldn’t be in such a promising position.

Soon after Forster’s return, Southampton’s attack was about to receive yet another injection of firepower in the January transfer window. With the £4 Million signing of Charlie Austin, fans of all clubs were labelling the deal the bargain of the window. And whilst the forward has only scored one goal since joining the club (what a goal it was at that) Austin has the perfect opportunity to prepare both physically and mentally over pre-season. Simply look to Shane Long as hope for what Austin could achieve with Southampton after a strong pre-season, continual hard work and remaining patient for his chance to arise. There is no doubting Austin’s ability, and at such a price, he is yet another positive for Southampton’s prosperous year so far.

Squad depth is a facet needed in any succesful side, providing the opportunity for players to rest, suspensions to be covered and competition for positions. Four years since Southampton’s return to the Premier League, this has been acheieved. After Jay Rodriguez’s hard fought battle with injury, I remember looking down at our team sheet in complete awe of the progress made as a squad. There sat on our bench on April 9th, 2016, was Jay Rodriguez, Cedric Soares, Oriol Romeu, Charlie Austin, Maya Yoshida and Maarten Stekelenburg. In previous years, Southampton have tailed off at the end of the season due to jaded physical conditions in the squad. But in 2016, Southampton have been able to take up the unprecedented act of injecting first-team quality players into the game from the bench – it’s no coincidence that with this wide array of options to change the game and keep players fresh, Southampton have beaten both Manchester City and Tottenham Hotspur’s in their final run-in. It’s hard to see Ronald Koeman accepting anything other than making this squad bigger, better and stronger this summer.

Finally, we come to an act that shows all Premier League Clubs that Southampton Football Club means business. On the 7th of March, Southampton tied down players player and fans player of the season, Virgil Van Dijk, on a new six-year contract. Not only was this an astute piece of business due to the Dutchman’s clear talent, but it’s also a statement. A statement of intent and ambition. A statement that tells Mane and Wanyama, that Southampton is the place to be if you want to further your career. In seasons gone by, the clubs ripest and rawest talents have been prized away by the League’s “Big boys”, causing stalled development of the club. Yet still, we manage to progress each year through the incredible planning and management of the club; by no means can this be labelled fortuitous. But as a fan who wants to see his team be the best they can possibly be, I have to wonder, what would have been if we held onto our finest talents? After this statement from the club, we may well find out this summer.

But just how good of a year has this been for Southampton? Well, second only to the Premier League Champions Leicester City to be exact. Over 2016, only Leicester City (41) have recorded more Premier League points than Southampton (36). Given our results in the latter stages of 2015 this season, Southampton being on the cusp of achieving back-to-back Europa League qualification isn’t half bad. In fact, it’s an incredible story that without Leicester City’s dream season occurring, would most likely be filling the back pages. However, whilst this would be a fully deserved achievement for the club, we want to keep growing, and therefore, this should only be seen as the beginning of something special. As Claudio Ranieri would say “Let’s dream”.

 

Ronald Koeman: This summers most important deal

Since Ronald Koeman took over in June 2014, Southampton fans have been gifted their highest Premier League finish and shown some of the league’s most attractive football – but it was the raw and hard felt passion on show from Ronald Koeman against Liverpool, that has left me desperate for more.

With just a single year left on his contract, It’s already been revealed that the club have opened talks with Ronald Koeman about a new deal – but the Dutchman insists he won’t decide on his future until the summer.

My point, however, is that I don’t just want the club to enter negotiations, I want them to impress. I want the board and higher forces to match, or potentially even surpass the clear ambition held by Ronald Koeman. This is the moment for our club to make a statement and show others, that we shall no longer be stripped of our finest assets.

Rather than chop, change and replace, we have to ensure that we maintain and build. Koeman signing a new contract would certainly do just that, as I believe that he is the man to take our club forward, here’s why…

Over the previous two summer transfer windows, Koeman has been presented the task of replacing and recovering a side striped of their core. Yet through these grueling months, Koeman has managed to pick out some of the Premier Leagues finest bargains and push Southampton on as a club.

Teams such as Liverpool, Tottenham Hotspur and Swansea crumbled beneath themselves with the departures of Luis Suarez, Gareth Bale and Wilfried Bony. Yet little old Southampton managed to survive, and progress, with the loss of seven guaranteed starters over a 12 month period.

You have to wonder, that if Koeman can bring such success in a side that was predicted for failure, imagine what he could conjure up without any departures?

Secondly, and unsurprisingly after last weekend’s madness, it’s the passion and class of Ronald Koeman. This personality has allowed for a connection between Koeman and the fans, something we so desired after a season with Mauricio Pochettino.

Under the Argentinian boss, the fans chants and praise were never met by a response. Instead, he would keep his head down and place all focus on the game – or the next move as we soon found out.

We were left out in the cold by Pochettino, but his results and the side’s performances helped to mask his lack of desire to truly be part of the club.

With Koeman, however, it’s a different story. Every chant is applauded. Every result is for the fans. Failure to perform is failing the fans. And as for that celebration when Sadio Mane struck the back of the net against Liverpool, it needs no explanation.

Koeman has embraced our club and it allows the fans to feel like we’re all part of a family. The way a football club should feel.

From his attractive style of football, his appreciation for English talent and his intelligent integration of youth, Koeman’s principles are also spot on. In fact, they work as a perfect match alongside the philosophies of Southampton Football Club. Finding a manager who can successfully embed all three principles into a club, are not only placing English football in a positive light, but are also rare.

And finally, his loyalty. As fans, we always talk about the desire to have individuals who show loyalty and the hunger to want more with Southampton. In the past, we’ve had players throw their handbags, demand for transfers as if they were a god given right and leave the club with the attempt to poison every last crevice. But now, we have a manager who loves his job at Southampton and a manager who wants to achieve… with us. Koeman took on a job that papers were calling a “nightmare” and continued to keep his cool as he helplessly watched the big boys raid our club twice over. Yet still, Koeman has promised to see out the final year of his contract with Southampton.

Considering the pressure and challenges that we have placed a manager of Koeman’s calibre  under, he has shown class and loyalty in abundance throughout.

Can we so willingly allow a man who has all of the above – whilst remaining the coolest and suavest manager in the league – to simply leave from a job that he loves?

This is an opportunity to create something truly special with an intelligent, professional and classy manager – a rare breed in modern football. To date, each and every decision that Koeman has made for the club has been calculated and undeniably successful. So, now that he is evidently hunting for greater funding and the means to push on, let’s show any who ever doubted Southampton Football clubs ambition, that they are wrong.

An incredibly detailed insight into the finances at Southampton FC

Whilst scrolling through tweets, retweets and various accounts on Twitter in hunt of all things Southampton, I stumbled across a site named The Swiss Ramble. This goldmine of information is produced by a figure that goes only by the name of “The Swiss Rambler” who, in their terms, “Usually writes about the business of football”. It sounds brief, incredibly so. But their work is far from it. This is easily accessible, yet incredibly detailed financial data for all fans to understand.

A better collection of such expansive and detailed financial data over Southampton’s 2013/14 and 2014/15 seasons simply can’t be found elsewhere. Take a look here

With it now being seven years since Southampton faced administration in 2009, this data helps fans to appreciate the incredible work that has been completed behind the scenes. The Swiss Rambler shines understanding, logic and knowledge on the figures, whilst also suggesting reasons for decisions that the club has made – don’t worry, it’s all good.

Did you know? Southampton’s revenue is now the 25th highest in the world according to the Deloitte Money League, around the same as world renowned clubs such as Marseille £109 million, AS Roma £107 million and Benfica £105 million. Impressive stuff.

Also, that It was striking how much Southampton over-performed in the 2013/14 season relative to their wage bill, which was only the 15th highest in the Premier League. Only five clubs had lower wages (Stoke City, Cardiff City, Norwich City, Crystal Palace and Hull City) and two of those were relegated. Southampton meanwhile finished eighth.

Just a few areas that this in-depth report covers are…

  • Profit/loss data
  • Pre-tax figures
  • The details on player sales and how they are recorded
  • The impact of player sales on profits
  • Attendances and the resulting revenue
  • Reliance on TV revenue
  • Commercial revenue
  • Wages to turnover
  • Debt
  • Use of funds
  • Cash balances

As you can imagine, the finances of Southampton FC are incredibly interesting and worth a look. Even more so when the hours of research and painstaking data collection has already been done for you. 

 

Fraser Forster: Facts, stats and stopping attacks

It’s been widely documented how Fraser Forster’s return of form has been the true beginning of Southampton’s season. Having struggled to combine their usual fluent attacking play with strong defensive performances over the first 20 fixtures, Forster came back into the side with the Saints sitting in 13th place. Fast forward five games and Southampton are now in contention for European Football, scoring freely and have leapfrogged Liverpool for 7th place.

But, just how good has he been?

“He’s so quiet but he gives a lot of confidence to defenders. It’s not a coincidence that when he comes back we start keeping clean sheets.” said Ronald Koeman on the goalkeeper that he calls “Magic”. Koeman is right, and the statistics are there to prove just that.

Since Forster put the gloves back on, he’s seen the opposition line up 62 shots. That includes 15 placed on target, which reflects Forster’s shot stopping ability. Whilst also including 47 shots off target, which tells us the low probability shots that the defence is forcing the opposition to make.

Forster has placed confidence in the defence, which allows the back line to hold a strong, yet high-risk position on the field. By Forster allowing the defence to play further up the pitch, thus pushing the opposition deep into their own half, it’s not just the defence that has reaped the benefits of Forster’s presence.

In turn, he can also authorise the defence to drop deep and carry out a “backs against the wall” performance with confidence and desire, rather than fear. As shown in the closing stages against Arsenal (A) and most recently, against Slaven Bilic’s West Ham (H).

To take risks, you need to be confident. To win, you need to take risks. And judging by Southampton’s poor early season form, It seems fair to suggest that Marteen Stekelenburg places lower levels of confidence in the defence than Forster.

It’s been 479 minutes of Premier League football since the six-foot-seven-inch monster returned and not once has he had to pick the ball out from the back of the net.

Not to mention that after Southampton’s 1-0 home win over West Ham, Fraser Forster’s clean sheet percentage is the best of any goalkeeper with 30 or more Premier League appearances. That’s 18 clean sheets from his 35 games (51.4%).

Forster has been the catalyst to Southampton’s incredible form and such feats can never be a coincidence in a League as competitive as the Premier League. Watch out Joe Hart, the Euros are coming and Forster certainly wants a taste of the action.

 

Interview: Talking with Le Tiss

Today we had the opportunity to sit down and talk about Southampton Football Club with the legend himself, Matthew Le Tissier. We talk about the season so far, the effect of confidence on a team, players of the past, transfers, Wednesday’s win over Watford, the famed academy, Ronald Koeman and Matt’s expectations for the remainder of the season. 

00:05 – The season so far

00:45 – The January transfer window and Rodriguez’s return date

02:23 – How to overcome squad confidence issues

03:12 – The Morale of squads in Tiss’s time

04:28 – Cliques in clubs

05:23 – The effect of morale on performance

06:04 – The most effective mid-season signing for Le Tiss

06:55 – Koeman under pressure and beating Watford

08:02 – A team full of home grown players?

09:03 – Who from the current crop of youngsters does Le Tiss have his eye on?

09:47 – How Koeman has dealt with Wanyama

10:03 – The full story on Mane’s late arrival to the team meeting

10:42 – Season expectations

 

Vive La Différence: Morgan Schneiderlin

Crunching last ditch tackles, calculated yellow cards and a perfectly crafted French beard; I’m of course talking about Morgan Schneiderlin. It’s now been 163 days since the Frenchman left for Manchester United – obsessed? I hear you ask. Maybe, and the task of replacing our defensive midfielder of seven years is proving rather difficult, nigh on impossible in all honesty.

To the average football fan, the £27M deal to Manchester United last summer plays testament to Schneiderlin’s talent. However, to us Southampton fans, he was far more than just the (brilliant) central link in the spine of our team. Schneiderlin embedded himself into the Southampton family and became one of the poster boys for our rise to the Premier League. We were all watching on when he arrived as a weedy 18-year-old, making it all the better to see him tame the Premier League’s finest attackers.

Through growing up with the club and the players around him, Schneiderlin managed to learn each player and his own game inside out. He knew exactly where to be, where to order others and where to recycle the ball. He knew that if Nathaniel Clyne was about to bomb forward, he would release the ball and pull wide without a seconds thought. He knew that if there was a gap on the edge of the box, Adam Lallana would glide inside from the wide areas; his game was played by instinct and my god did he do it well. Games would pass by where his influence on the match seemed minimal; in truth, he was often so perfectly positioned that rarely, not even for a split second was he caught out. They say the best defensive midfielders go unnoticed. He was always there, picking up through balls, chopping down an overlapping fullback and switching the play.

The combination of an incredible talent with years of experience was on show for all to see when under the Premier League’s spotlight. For Schneiderlin to be replaced sufficiently, we would need a midfielder with greater talent, in order to make up for the loss in his understanding of Southampton, tactics in place and those around him. We simply can’t attract a player of that quality; our midfield is weaker and that’s the way that it will stay for now. As a fan of an ambitious Football Club, it’s hard to come to terms with.

To put it into facts, Southampton have conceded 21 Premier League goals in 17 fixtures this season. Last season – with Morgan Schneiderlin – Southampton only conceded 33 goals in 38 games. If we continue in this fashion then we are scheduled to concede 47 goals. 47.
Then let’s take a look at Manchester United. With Morgan Schneiderlin in the side, they have played nine games, winning six and drawing three. All whilst averaging 0.33 goals conceded per game.
Without Schneiderlin? Eight games, two wins, two draws and four defeats. Averaging 1.875 goals conceded per game. If his influence on a side wasn’t clear to see by the naked eye, it certainly is when printed in black and white.

There has been much talk about summer recruit Jordy Clasie being the one to fill Morgan’s boots, despite the fact the Dutchman’s qualities are that of a roaming playmaker. Whilst his technical ability is clear to see and his name now fills the gap where Morgan’s used to be, he can’t carry out the same destructive midfield role. As a result, a forced change of system and time needed for integration has affected our results and performances.
For Clasie, also read fellow Frenchman Giannelli Imbula of Porto; another name that has been tipped as the must-have replacement for Morgan.

Fans have been fixated with finding the player that they can name “The Next Morgan”, but sometimes however, the boots are too big to fill. Sometimes, you simply can not replace. Look to Gareth Bale at Tottenham Hotspur, Luis Suarez at Liverpool and on a smaller scale, Christian Benteke at Aston Villa. All four of the above players were picked up as young prospects that flourished during their time at their respected clubs – sadly, bigger clubs come calling for the bigger players. The cycle goes on.

Rather than looking to fill the gap that Schneiderlin left behind, we need to look forward and rebuild. Aiming to replace this exact position and role will only result in failure as a comparison to what we have seen with the Frenchman. It’s time to build a new role that is better suited to the players at our disposal.

Where we have gone against the odds in the past and replaced when many believed it to be an impossible task, we may have to admit defeat this time. There is no harm in doing so when we know that Morgan Schneiderlin is a world class footballer.
Allez, Morgan.

 

Talking Point: The Recent Reluctance On Academy Promotion

Ronald Koeman recently spoke out about his role as Southampton boss, stating that he sees himself as a day-to-day manager, rather than looking at his job as a three year project. Having dealt with two gruelling transfer window’s that saw key players depart for big money moves, such a viewpoint is understandable; as a matter of fact, it’s been the perfect take on a challenge that many managers wouldn’t be fit to face. However, this outlook from Koeman could also explain his reluctance to promote youth into the first team.

Since his arrival in 2014, Ronald Koeman has seen Luke Shaw, Adam Lallana, Dejan Lovren, Rickie Lambert, Calum Chambers, Morgan Schneiderlin, Nathaniel Clyne and even loanee Toby Alderweireld leave the club. Losing five first team players in the first season, followed by three star players in Koeman’s second summer was always going to result in a call for experience. Once a club has been shaken as much as Southampton have been, dependable players with a strong mentality are the first to be called upon –  fragmenting academy players in turn.

Southampton needed to find their feet and steady the ship at the start of both seasons; calling upon young players at that time would have been a classic case of trying to run before you can walk.

When aiming to integrate academy players into the first team, you need a strong spine and experienced players alongside. The academy players need to be familiar with their surroundings and how those around them play, in order to impress when given their chance. That integration proves rather difficult once your experienced players have been poached by other teams.  Throwing a young inexperienced player in a side that is still under great development can be damaging on results and the youngsters mentality.

Simply take a look at how Premier League sides fair in the League Cup when they throw a collection of academy players, first team stars and second string choices together. The combination ultimately results in a not so unpredictable cup upset.

The best time to integrate young players is once you have a settled squad, but how frequently throughout his reign has the Dutchman held a settled squad? This period of fire fighting and balancing the team has taken up a vast amount of Koeman’s time on the South coast. Not mentioning our push for European football; which the Dutchman succeeded in achieving. Koeman has been thrown countless challenges and with each problem, he has come out on top.

The real catalyst behind our recent lack of academy progression is with the senior management and powers that be. Whilst they continue to provide spectacular facilities and develop one of the best academies in Europe, they also shoot themselves in the foot with the sale of our stars. This decision has blocked the pathway for academy players into the first team. However, preventing this is far easier said than done.

Koeman is so focused on having to rebuild the squad and get points on the board, that he is simply unable to place faith into academy players. You need a balance of experience, stability, quality and youth to bring long term success to a football club. Koeman has been limited on all four at the start of both seasons.

I’m certain that with a promise from the executives that we stand strong in the market, Koeman will provide a stream of home produced youngsters into the first team.